Law Enforcement & Prosecution Monthly U Visa Roundtable

To register for the Law Enforcement & Prosecution Monthly U Visa Roundtable, visit http://www.niwap.org/go/LEAroundtables/

To find materials from previous roundtables, visit http://niwaplibrary.wcl.american.edu/2016/03/law-enforcement-prosecution-monthly-u-visa-roundtable/

Purpose of our Monthly U visa Roundtables:

The National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project (NIWAP), in partnership with the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), is excited to announce the launch of its virtual Monthly U Visa Roundtable Series for Law Enforcement and Prosecutors. NIWAP’s national faculty of law enforcement officers and prosecutors, who are experts on U visa certifications and language access, will lead these monthly calls and provide live technical assistance on U visa and/or language access questions participants may have.

In these monthly conference calls, which are limited to law enforcement and prosecutors, NIWAP’s law enforcement trainers will discuss best practices and address questions on U visa certification and language access and how each plays a crucial role in improving victim, officer, and community safety.

Attendees will also have the opportunity to ask case specific questions and receive live technical assistance. In an effort to facilitate useful and informed discussion, these roundtables will be exclusively available to law enforcement and prosecution officials only.

The training faculty include:

  • Officer Michael P. LaRiviere, Salem Police Department, Salem, Massachusetts
  • Detective Stacey Ivie, Alexandria Police Department, Alexandria, Virginia
  • Detective Shelli Sonnenberg, Boise Police Department, Boise, Idaho
  • Sergeant Inspector Antonio Flores, San Francisco Police Department,                                    San Francisco, California

The first roundtable, “U and T Visas as Crime Fighting Tools: Best Practices for Law Enforcement and Prosecutors Working With Immigrant Survivors,” introduced the U visa as a crime fighting tool. We also established the foundation for future roundtables to best assist law enforcement and prosecution with knowledge and tools to keep victims, officers, and communities safe through the U visa certification process. It was held March 24, 2016.

The second roundtable, “Determining Helpfulness in the U Visa Certification Process,” covered the helpfulness requirement of the U visa certification process. In order to obtain a law enforcement certification, DHS regulations state that a victim must have been helpful, is being helpful, or is likely to be helpful in the detection, investigation, prosecution, conviction, or sentencing of a qualifying U visa criminal activity. The roundtable was held April 28, 2016.

The third session, “Streamlining Your Agency’s U Visa Policy and Practice,” covered the elements of an effective U visa certification policy and the benefits of adopting such policies to law enforcement agencies. U visas can serve as a useful tool for law enforcement to better serve immigrant victims of crime by removing the fear of deportation when they report criminal activity. Model policies help departments adopt U visa certification procedures that streamline the process to ensure that department resources are utilized in the best way possible. This roundtable discussed the elements of successful policies and how departments can adopt these policies seamlessly. It was held June 29, 2016.

The fourth roundtable, “Open Forum Discussion on All Things U Visa,” focused on questions from law enforcement and prosecutors regarding U visa certifications, language access and the unique situations that arise when working with immigrant victims of crime. A team of national experts from both law enforcement and prosecution moderated and provided guidance to participants. It was held August 25, 2016.

For more information contact Bebe Anver, NIWAP Policy Staff Attorney, at: 

Office 202-274-4393| | banver@niwap.org

This project is supported by Grant No. 2014-TA-AX-K030 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions and recommendations expressed in this flyer are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.